Javed Ahmad

Javed Ahmad Magray was studying in his room when his family saw him alive for the last time. It was late in the evening of 30 April 2003.

– The next morning, Javed was gone.

Javed Ahmad Magray was studying in his room when his family saw him alive for the last time. It was late in the evening of 30 April 2003. The next morning, Javed was gone.

His father Ghulam Nabi Magray saw a few army personnel standing at the gate outside, and told them that his son was missing. They said, “Don’t look for him, and go back inside.” But down the road, Ghulam Nabi and his wife Fatima Begum could see bloodstains and a tooth lying on the pavement.

During the investigations that followed, Ghulam Nabi testi?ed that the of?cer in charge of the army camp at Soiteng had told them that Javed was in the Nowgam police station. The family had rushed to the police station, only to be told that Javed had been brought there at about 3 am but was then taken to Barzalla Hospital, then shifted to SMSH Hospital, and ?nally to Soura Medical Institute, where he was declared dead.

An of?cer at Soiteng testi?ed during investigations that Javed had been wounded in an encounter with some security force personnel, and was taken to Nowgam police station and later to a hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries.

Relatives and neighbours of Javed, his teachers, and representatives of the army and police took part in the inquiry into his death carried out by the district magistrate. The report concluded that the army’s version of events was false, and that the “deceased boy was not a militant…and has been killed without any justi?cation by a Subedar [a junior commissioned of?cer in the Indian Army] and his army men being the head of the patrolling party.”

Ghulam Nabi knows that the case was sent for sanction – or of?cial permission to prosecute the security force personnel – under the AFSPA in 2007 but says he has received no information on the outcome of the application. “We simply never heard what happened with it,” he said.

“The problem is that the army never accepts that sometimes these violations happen. They’re always in denial,” Ghulam Nabi said.

THE PETITION

Fifteen Kashmiri families who lost their loved ones in cases of human rights violations by the security forces in Jammu and Kashmir are urging the Ministry of Home Affairs and Ministry of Defense to ensure the right to truth for victims, their families and affected communities and ensure that they have access to full disclosure about human rights violations. The families want both the ministries to:

1. Make informartion available related to all 15 cases highlighted by Amnesty International India on this digital platform.

2. Make information pertaining to the proceedings, verdicts and sentences of courts-martial and security force courts publicly accessible including through the Right to Information Act, 2005 and by other means including an online database

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